Just a little fall

Colors in Wisconsin seem pretty variable this year, probably due to the unusual weather through summer very early fall.  I did make it up to the northern part of the state, though, and found some nice scenery.  Here’s a few autumn images for those of you missing the changing season.

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Morning Watch

It’s the time of year when sunrise closely matches my drive to work.  Which fortunately takes me right by Lake Michigan.  I’m making a point of taking my camera along in case something great shows up and it turns out to be a good idea.

There is a local marina right by a nice hill overlooking the lake and breakwater.  This morning there was more haze than clouds, enough to give a somewhat dreamy effect to the scene.  A few waterfowl were wandering around looking for breakfast, nice addition to the composition.

Watching a sunrise is something to take time and consider as conditions change each second.  It’s easy to keep looking for different light and perspective, only to forget there are other subjects being affected as well.  Fortunately I turned around and behind me was this high-rise, a glass and steel structure waking up to the early light.  What you see is simply the sunrise reflecting off the windows of the building.

Earlier this week there were clouds heading east over the lake, with just enough gap under them for the horizon to be clear as the sun came up.  Just at that right moment when the light caught the underside of the clouds, right before the sun was hidden behind them, I was very happy to have thought this through and planned for just this image.

Only a few more days of this confluence of my time and the sun’s position.  Hopefully the week will deliver open skies and interesting subjects.

Holiday wanderings

Nice Labor Day weekend visit to the International Crane Foundation near Baraboo, WI.  They’ll be closing down for winter in a month or so and I wanted to make some more images there this year.  It was a cloudy day so the light was even and not harsh.  Their exhibits are well done and fun even if you aren’t a crane fanatic.  There are quite a few endangered crane species in the world and the Foundation works to preserve habitat as well as repopulate birds.  They hand-rear various species for relocation around the globe.  Hurricane Harvey did quite a bit of damage to their facility near Houston, which is involved with whooping crane research and repopulation.  You can contribute to their efforts by clicking on the link above.

Black Crowned Crane, International Crane Foundation

Whooping Crane, International Crane Foundation

Thought I’d practice with fast moving birds a bit but the gull population down by the lake was absent, with very few birds flying down the beach.  Pretty odd – maybe they had filled up on tourist snacks earlier in the day.  With the good weather, however, there were several fast moving objects on the water the practice on.

425mm, f/5, 1/1000sec

After waiting a bit and enjoying the sailboats gliding around the harbor I finally got this guy cruising the area.

425mm, f/5, 1/1600sec

The gear is all working as I hoped but I still need to work on the continuous focus system in my camera.  It doesn’t always react as fast as I think I need and it sometimes doesn’t focus on the subject I’m seeing.  Just need more birds flying by.

Blaze of glory

A summer that at times hardly felt like its promise of heat and humidity is starting to wind down.  Erratic trees are showing signs of fall colors, flowers are blossoming out as if for one last fling, migratory birds are grazing continuously as if on a time clock counting down to the trip south.  Across it all the colors of summer are brilliant.

All images around Horicon Marsh in Wisconsin.

Side of the road – someone sharing job

Pending summer end

Lunch

Passing through toward south

Waiting for a bee

Purple veil

More fun from a distance

I keep returning to Horicon Marsh searching for a whooping crane.  Now that I’ve got the gear to reach out and touch this rarely seen bird, he seems to be avoiding me.  Just have to keep it up, I guess.

Not that the time there is a waste.  I’m learning more about the terrain, the roads, the wildlife.  Seems the swifts that hang around one of the viewing stands are starting to get used to me.  Not that they are any happier about my presence.

My photography colleague Steve Russell is building quite a portfolio of macro images – you should take a look the result of his effort.  His technique is usually the traditional approach – macro lens, solid tripod, lots of patience to get the subject framed and exposed to his liking.  I’m not as good as Steve at getting close nor as patient to wait for the right moment.  Fortunately with my 300mm lens I can stand back and fill the frame.  Great for getting tight with a subject you can’t easily get to.

Sure, I could have been like Steve and gotten to this with a macro lens but it would have meant wading through a foot of marsh whereas I was able to stand on the boardwalk and get just as close as I wanted.  Like I said, Steve is better at this than me.

The swifts are an interesting crowd.  They zip around the boardwalk chasing each other (or invisible insects) all the while chatting about something.  For a break, they sit on the rope banister for the boardwalk and chat with each other.  Must be lots of gossip to keep up with in the marsh.

At the other end of the activity scale are the egrets and herons.  Patiently waiting for the right snack to appear, not getting in a rush for anything.  It seems they even take their time talking with each other.  Maybe they are sticklers for using just the right sentence structure or word choice.

The marsh serves as a very large nursery each year, as parents raise kids to be a part of the huge avian world.  This time of year the youngsters are showing some post-adolescent plumage as they look forward to following their parents south to escape the chill that will cover the marsh with ice and snow.  This young sandhill crane, not yet with his red skullcap, is strolling through the fields with mom and dad.

With so much to see there are opportunities for a little abstract, countering the soft, rounded edges of the marsh with man’s insistence on linear and angular.

I’m very pleased with the performance of this lens – it stretches me to be a better photographer for composition, exposure, focus and storytelling.